Today, Radio’s Digital Dilemma: Broadcasting in the Twenty-First Century was formally unleashed upon the world.

As I’ve said before, for the most part it’s a work that chronicles an important constitutive moment in the history of U.S. radio broadcasting, and holds lessons about how our system of contemporary media policymaking works (or doesn’t) more broadly. I approached it more like an act of muckraking, in the purest sense of the term, than anything else.

While I’m very relieved that this project is complete, the story of HD Radio itself is far from over. In fact, 2014 could bring some important new developments that will provide us with a clearer picture about the technology’s future prospects.

There is some actual buzz about the book, and I’ve received kind words from former FCC officials, fellow media policy scholars/activists, and even other publishers. I’m hoping next year is a busy one with regard to spreading the word about the book and the issues it raises for legitimate (and long overdue) debate.

Routledge has confirmed that if 200 copies of the original hardcover and/or e-book are sold, this will trigger a paperback run.

I know (and do not like the fact) that the first-run price is steep: the best way to spread the word is to request that your local libraries order a copy. But if you are willing to plunk down, you can get Radio’s Digital Dilemma at a discount. If you order through Routledge directly, use code JRK96 at checkout for an automatic 20% off; at Amazon, the Kindle version is also $25 cheaper. Think of it as investing in/helping to promote a very necessary discussion about the future of radio as we’ve known it.